Non-Object (Plane)

Anish Kapoor

Location

Ray and Maria Stata Center (Building 32G) TSMC Lobby

Non-Object (Plane) by Anish Kapoor stands 16-feet tall, a little over 7-feet wide, and weighs around 3,500 pounds. Its monumental, concave form contrasts with the work’s delicate structure and surface of mirror-polished stainless steel, a material the artist has worked with extensively; the piece also provides a striking counterpoint to the eccentric forms and metal cladding of the Stata Center’s Frank Gehry architecture.

Visitors encountering the sculpture can engage directly with the work’s playful reflections of themselves and the surrounding space, animated by light from the overhead skylight and clerestory windows. This piece is an example of Kapoor’s interest in voids, perceptual ambiguities, and continuities between form and space. The artist is perhaps best know for his 110-ton stainless steel sculpture Cloud Gate in Chicago’s Millennium Park, which was inspired by the shape of liquid mercury.

Kapoor has remarked: “I’ve always felt a fascination with the modern, the industrial, the mechanical, the seemingly scientific–and then to use these materials in order to search for their opposite–the intimate and the sublime.”

This artwork was commissioned for the TMSC Lobby as part of MIT’s landmark Percent-for-Art Program, which allots funds to commission or purchase art for each new major campus renovation or building project. Kapoor’s work was made possible by donations that supplemented the available Percent-for-Art funds, including generous gifts from an anonymous donor; Robert Sanders ’64 and the Sanders family; The David W. Bermant Foundation: Color, Light, Motion; and Julian Cherubini ’57.

Read more about Anish Kapoor

Brochure

Date

2010

Medium

Stainless steel

Size

192 in. x 84 in. (487.68 cm x 213.36 cm)

Credit

Commissioned with MIT Percent-for-Art Funds and generous gifts from an anonymous donor; Robert Sanders ’64 and the Sanders family; The David W. Bermant Foundation: Color, Light, Motion; and Julian Cherubini, MIT Class of 1957