• Miriam Simun

Public Program Thinking with the Body

April 19, 2018, 2:00PM - 4:00PM

MIT List Visual Arts Center, 20 Ames St., Cambridge, MA 02139

Catalyst Conversations, MIT List Visual Arts Center and MIT Office of Government and Community Relations are pleased to present a STEAM conversation: Thinking with the Body. This is an interactive conversation for all ages exploring and experiencing creativity through the intersection of science and dance.

This program features Miriam Simun, an MIT research-based artist investigating the implications of socio-technical and environmental change with the project Training Transhumanism (I Want to Become a Cephalopod) and choreographer and dance historian Jody Weber whose latest creative work is Her Sylvan Ascent. This is an interactive conversation for all ages exploring and experiencing creativity through the intersection of science and dance. Presented as part of the 11th annual Cambridge Science Festival, April 13-22.

 About the Speakers:

Miriam Simun is a research-based artist investigating the implications of socio-technical and environmental change. She is a graduate of the London School of Economics, and the Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University. Her work has been the subject of numerous international presentations, including exhibitions at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York; the Museum of Arts and Design, New York; the DeutscheBank Kunsthalle, Berlin; The Contemporary, Baltimore; Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Split; the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha; the Himalayas Museum, Shanghai; and the Beall Center for Art + Technology, Irvine. Simun is a recipient of awards from Creative Capital, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, the Joan Mitchell Foundation, and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts. She was the recipient of the Santa Fe Art Institute’s 2015 Food Justice Residency in New Mexico, and the OMI International Arts Center’s 2016 Artist Residency in New York. Simun’s work has received extensive coverage in media outlets both stateside and abroad, including the BBC, The New York Times, The New Yorker, CBC, MTV, Forbes, Art21, and ARTNews.

Training Transhumanism (I Want to Become a Cephalopod) is a psycho-physical training regimen for evolving the future of the human, developed in collaboration with choreographer Luciana Achugar. The regimen seeks to develop within the human new sensitivities and capacities, based on the model of the cephalopod, in preparation for a world marked by ever-increasing ecological and technological change.

 Jody Weber received a BFA from SUNY Purchase in 1988, an M.A. from American University in 1992, and a Ph.D. in dance history from Boston University in 2005. Dr. Weber’s research has been presented Dance History Scholars Conference held at the New York Public Library in 1993 and through the Hall of Black Achievement at Bridgewater State University in 1999. In June 0f 2001 she worked on the Boston Dance History Survey with Ruth Benson-Levin through the Boston Dance Alliance. This project established the foundation to build an archive on local dance history. Currently, she is currently tenured full professor in the Dance Department at Bridgewater State University and author of The Evolution of Aesthetic and Expressive Dance in Boston.

Dr. Weber is also Artistic Director and Choreographer for Weber Dance, a nonprofit concert dance company based in Boston Massachusetts. She was an invited participant in the 2010 Choreographer’s Lab at Jacob’s Pillow and has received grants from the Boston Center for The Arts, Somerville Arts Council, the Cambridge Arts Council, The Boston Dance Alliance and numerous research grants through the Center for Advancement of Research and Scholarship. Her choreography has been presented in venues in New York City, San Francisco, Florida, Montana, British Columbia, Alaska, Colorado, Maine and Washington D.C. Her newest work, Her Sylvan Ascent, will be co-presented by the Somerville Arts Council on June 14, 2018 and at the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum on June 23, 2018.

This program is free and open to all.  To attend this event RSVP here.

For more information, contact:

Emily A. Garner
eagarner@mit.edu

  • Photo credit: Miriam Simun

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