Podcasts

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Our iTunes Podcast is currently in development. In the meantime, we'll be providing mp3 files of several events below.  Select an event to stream the audio.  To download the .mp3, right click on the link and select "Save Link As."

 

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Group Zero: A Talk by Joe Ketner   (67 minutes)

november 17, 2011

 

Joseph D. Ketner II is the Henry Lois Foster Chair in Contemporary Art Theory and Practice, Distinguished Curator-in-Residence Emerson College, Boston.  Ketner has been conducting research and focusing on the German Gruppe Zero (Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, and Günther Uecker) with a particular focus on their formative role in the transformation of art in post-World War II Europe.  Recently Ketner published an essay for Heinz Mack’s exhibition at Sperone Westwater Gallery, New York (2011).  He also assisted Otto Piene on the recreation of a slide projection performance of Proliferation of the Sun and a Sky Art event (2010-2011).  Ketner's talk will provide a historical framing of Otto Piene's involvement with Group Zero.  This progam is presented in conjunction with the List Center's current exhibition Otto Piene: Lichtballett.

 

Otto Piene: Lichtballett, Hans Haacke 1967: Artist Talks    (54 minutes)

OCTOBER 20, 2011


Otto Piene: Lichtballett, an exhibition of the light-based sculptural work of renowned media artist Otto Piene. Known for multimedia “sky art,” Piene was a founder of the influential Group ZERO, a Düsseldorf-based group of artists that pioneered performance, kinetic, and environmental art in the 1960s. Piene was the first fellow of the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS) in 1968, eventually succeeding founder György Kepes as its director until 1994.

 

Hans Haacke 1967, an exhibition that revisits Hans Haacke’s 1967 solo exhibition at MIT. Although some photographic material related to the exhibition at the Hayden Gallery at MIT exists (published in The Tech newspaper at the time) no significant documentation or critical text on this important project has ever been produced. The result of intensive research and collaboration with the artist, Hans Haacke 1967 will revisit this significant body of work as well as document part of MIT’s historical contribution to contemporary art.

 

From Sociological Art to the Aesthetics of Communication: A Lecture by Fred Forest   (87 minutes)

September 20, 2011


French media artist and theorist Fred Forest (born in 1933) is one of the earliest pioneers of video and media art. His work with interactive environments using computer and video elements, began as early as 1968. At the forefront of interactive art and new media, sociology, and institutional critique, his work frequently immaterial and relational, raises questions about the nature and function of art in a market-driven age of information. A retrospective of his work was held at the Slought Foundation in Philadelphia in 2007. Forest has exhibited and presented at institutions including, the Centre Georges Pompidou, Espace Pierre Cardin, and the Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Currently artist in residence in New York at Residency Unlimited supported by the Institut Francais, Fred Forest is implementing a global interactive project at the Centre d'art Albi, France and has several upcoming projects scheduled in the United States August and September.

 

The List Visual Arts Center wishes to thank The Cultural Service of the French Consulate in Boston, Residency Unlimited, and the MIT-France Program for their generous assistance in making this talk possible.

 

Video Trans Americas: A Talk by John Hanhardt   (67 minutes)

june 23, 2011


John G. Hanhardt is consulting senior curator for the Nam June Paik Media Arts Center at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Since beginning his career at the Department of Film at the Museum of Modern Art, he has organized film and media arts programming and exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, the Whitney Museum of Modern Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. John Hanhardt met Juan Downey in the early 1970s and his first project with the artist at the Whitney Museum of American Art, in 1976, was the large-scale media-art installation Video Trans Americas. Hanhardt will share his thoughts on this seminal work and his relationship with the artist.

 

A conversation with catalogue essayist Gustavo Buntinx and Marilys Belt de Downey, moderated by curator Valerie Smith   (62 minutes)

may 4, 2011


Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect is the first United States museum survey of the work of Chilean-born video artist Juan Downey (1940-1993). Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect features a selection of key works by this under-recognized pioneer of video art. A fellow at MIT's Center for Advanced Visual studies in 1973 and 1975, Downey played a significant role in the New York art scene of the 1970s and 1980s.

 

Ranging thematically over several decades of the artist's work, the exhibition includes early experiments with art and technology that mark a shift from object-based artistic practice to an experiential approach seeking to combine interactive performance with sculpture and video.  Along with this foundational early work, the exhibition also features Downey's video installations of the 1970s and 1980s. These combine an autobiographical approach with the style of anthropological documentary-one of his most important contributions to the medium.

 

Steam Screens and Under Aquarius: A Talk by Artist Joan Brigham  (39 minutes)

march 17, 2011


A Research Fellow from 1974-1999 at MIT's Center for Advanced Visual Studies, and Professor Emeritus in Fine art, Emerson College, environmental artist Joan Brigham pioneered the use of steam in her work. She participated in 1977 documenta 6 in Kassel Germany, with Centerbeam and worked on a number of works collaboratively with Stan VanDerBeek including Steam Screens and Under Aquarius.  Brigham will discuss these works and her collaborative relationship with VanDerBeek.

 

A conversation with LVAC curator João Ribas and former MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS) director, and artist Otto Piene   (96 minutes)

february 24, 2011

 

Internationally respected sculptor Otto Piene succeeded Professor Gyorgy Kepes as director of the CAVS at MIT in 1974. In his nearly 20 years as director of the Center, Piene built on the legacy of Kepes by fostering a creative collaboration of artists, scientists, and engineers at the center, including Stan VanDerBeek.  Piene will share his thoughts on VanDerBeek's work in the context of the Center's mission.

 

Panel Discussion with Bill Arning, Johannes VanDerBeek, and Sara VanDerBeek - moderated by LVAC curator João Ribas (71 minutes)

february 3, 2011

 

The MIT List Visual Arts Center is pleased to present a panel discussion with Bill Arning, Director, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, Johannes VanDerBeek, and Sara VanDerBeek. This pre-reception talk will be moderated by LVAC curator João Ribas.

 

Stan VanDerBeek: The Culture Intercom is the first museum survey of the work of media art pioneer Stan VanDerBeek, exploring his investigation of art, technology, and communication. Surveying the artist’s remarkable body of work in collage, experimental film, performance, participatory and computer-generated art over several decades, Stan VanDerBeek: The Culture Intercom highlights the artist’s pivotal contribution to today’s media-based artistic practices.

 

Hallucination and Ineffability: A Talk with MIT Professor Alex Byrne (94 minutes)

DECember 2, 2010

 

MIT Professor of Philosophy Alex Byrne will lead a discussion about the philosophy of mind (particularly perception and consciousness) in relation to the List Center's current exhibition, Melvin Moti: The Prisoner's Cinema.

 

Artist Talk with Melvin Moti (87 minutes)

november 17, 2010

 

Melvin Moti: The Prisoner’s Cinema is the first U.S. museum exhibition of the work of Dutch artist Melvin Moti (b. 1977, Rotterdam).  The work of Melvin Moti gives form to incidents, events, and subjects displaced from historical narratives. The artist’s practice often revolves around research on a forgotten, hidden, or obscure phenomenon. The Prisoner’s Cinema (2008) is based on reports of hallucinations resulting from periods of prolonged visual deprivation. Prisoners confined in a dark cell have repeatedly described experiencing vivid hallucinations of multicolored light. The phenomenon has come to be known as ‘the prisoner’s cinema.’ The reduced stimulation of vision produces various colors that seem to emerge out of darkness, and geometric shapes that seem to be projected in front of the viewer. Those who have experienced the phenomena find it difficult to describe; the ‘prisoner’s cinema’ is also thought to explain some types of supernatural events, as well as religious visions. In The Biography of a Phantom (2004), Moti documents locations in London where the famed ghost of Katie King has appeared. Perhaps the most famous apparition in the history of spiritualism, she first manifested in the 1870s, her image captured in photographs through the early 20th century.

 

Artist Talk with Frances Stark (49 minutes)

October 21, 2010

 

Frances Stark: This could become a gimick [sic] or an honest articulation of the workings of the mind, is the first U.S. museum survey of the work of Los Angeles artist and writer, Frances Stark (b. 1967, Newport Beach, California). For over two decades, Stark has laid bare the creative act in all its tedium and enchantment. With distinctive wit and candor, her expressly personal language reflects an interest in the relationship between art, literature, and everyday life.  As a writer and artist, Stark proposes that the creative self is a performance, what she calls "a torment of follies" riddled with self-doubt and speculation—and the occasional moment of transcendence. Language, as both subject matter and material, has been a central theme in the artist's work. The elliptical style that typifies her writing is echoed in an often text-based artistic practice; along with clusters of typewritten letters, Stark employs literary fragments from a wide variety of sources, from Emily Dickinson to pop music. With an abiding interest in the interplay between image and text, Stark's iconography also incorporates elements drawn from her personal and professional life. Her intricately textured collages reflect a concern with the tactile, intimate, and handmade, while wryly addressing the gender roles associated with professional and domestic spaces such as the artist's studio. While describing an attempt to render the poetic from the mundane, Stark’s work also reflects a poignant search for the "kind of 'liberation' I—as a woman, artist, teacher, mother, ex-wife—am really after."

 

Artist Talk features:  Pre-reception discussion with artist Frances Stark, moderated by LVAC curator João Ribas.

 

Panel Discussion with Tavares Strachan and MIT residency partners (57 minutes)

May 6, 2010

 

The MIT List Visual Arts Center is pleased to present Orthostatic Tolerance: It Might Not Be Such a Bad Idea if I Never Went Home, the next phase of a new project by Bahamian-born, New York-based artist Tavares Strachan. Since 2006, Strachan has been working on this multiphase body of work that explores space and deep-sea training. “Orthostatic” means to stand upright, and “tolerance” refers to the ability to withstand pressure. Combined, the phrase refers to the physiological stress that cosmonauts and deep-sea explorers endure while exiting, and re-entering our home, the thin surface of planet Earth.

 

Over the course of numerous visits begun in July 2009, Strachan met with researchers and scholars in the departments of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the MIT Sea Grant College Program's Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Lab. In addition the artist collaborated with a group of graduate students in MIT’s 3-D Imaging Optical Group to create a nano-sized topographical landscape. Strachan’s work with the MIT Sea Grant College program was focused on creating a submersible underwater sea rover entirely out of blown glass, while the Man Vehicle Space Laboratory at MIT served as a location for a film shoot documenting the artist in training for his experiments with gravitational stress.

 

Panel features:  Artist Tavares Strachan, Professor Dava Newman, MacVicar Faculty Fellow, MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Associate Professor George Barbastathis, MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering's 3D Optical Systems Group, and Mike Soroka, Research Engineer at the MIT Sea Grant College Program’s Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Lab. The panelists who participated in Strachan's artist residency program at MIT discuss their experiences collaborating with the artist.  Moderated by LVAC director Jane Farver.


Panel discussion with Charles Atlas, Michelle Handelman, and John Kelly - moderated by guest curator Michael Rush (60 minutes)

February 4, 2010

 

This group exhibition, organized by guest curator Michael Rush, explores what has traditionally been called cross-dressing (drag) as a tactic for media artists that has been central to the development of the current avant-garde. The show explores how experimental art has been invigorated and advanced by artists who cross dress for many different reasons as part of their conceptual process. The exhibition will feature videos, installations, photographs, and performances. Artists include Charles Atlas, Matthew Barney, Claude Cahun, Harry Dodge and Stanya Kahn, Marcel Duchamp, Michelle Handelman, John Kelly, Katarzyna Kozyra, Kalup Linzy, Ma Liuming, Manon, Pierre Molinier, Yasumasa Morimura, Brian O’Doherty, Ryan Trecartin, and Andy Warhol. About the curator: Michael Rush is a museum director, award winning curator, and widely published author and critic. He was director of the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University from 2005-2009, and director of the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art from 2000-2004.

 

Tobias Putrih and MOS: Without Out (57 minutes) 

October 22, 2009

 

Artist Tobias Putrih uses everyday materials such as cardboard, Styrofoam™, and plywood to produce fragile structures that span from small modular objects to larger installation environments. Recent work has featured Putrih's collaboration with MOS, a collective of designers and architects that creates software and uses customized tools of parametric design to produce simple but highly complex structures and buildings. The two principals, Michael Meredith and Hilary Sample, teach at Harvard University and Yale University while maintaining the practice. In a recent installation Overhang, shown at the Baltic Center for Contemporary Art, (England) Putrih and MOS created a Styrofoam™ brick structure in a constant verge of collapse. The project was based on a mathematical problem that determines the maximum overhang of a brick stack—the software developed by MOS generates brick stacks in minimal structural equilibrium. Intervention #10, created for the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, (the Netherlands) continued to examine aesthetic values of original parametric design through the creation of a primitive arch.

 

Putrih’s exhibition at the List Visual Arts Center features a newly commissioned work, Erosion, a large scale sculptural installation of eroded Styrofoam™ blocks that the viewer can enter to experience the structure’s inner space. As Putrih and MOS have decided to present the project in a “fixed” state, the blocks are glued together and the structure is presented here as the pure possibility of generated form. In addition, working models, and other support materials further illuminate the collaboration between Putrih and MOS.

 

 

Talk with Dominic Hall, curator of the Warren Anatomical Museum (71 minutes)

June 11, 2009

Dominic Hall is the curator of The Warren Anatomical Museum which is part of the Countway Library of Medicine's Center for the History of Medicine. The Warren Museum was created from the original donation of Dr. John Collins Warren's (1778-1856) personal specimen collection.  The Museum's present collection contains approximately 15,000 items including: anatomical and pathological specimens; various wax, paper mache, and dry preparation anatomical models; photographs, prints, paintings, and drawings; medical instruments and machines; and other medical memorabilia. Along with the well-known skull of Phineas Gage, the Museum holds many other rare and interesting items. Matthew Day Jackson visited the collection to research Phineas Gage. The collection also influenced Jackson's development of the sculptural installation Study Collection, currently on view in Jackson's exhibition The Immeasurable Distance.

Hall discusses the Warren Museum collection and its importance in the context of medical history and education.

Conversation with Duncan Campbell (69 minutes)
May 21, 2009

Duncan Campbell’s film "Bernadette" presents an unconventional yet insightful portrait of Irish dissident and political activist Bernadette Devlin. Campbell’s film utilizes archival material, found footage, animation, and scripted voice-over to upend the formal conventions of documentary filmmaking. The film serves as an exploration of recent history and subversively critiques and questions the methods by which historical figures are represented by the media.  This film was presented in conjunction with Matthew Day Jackson's The Immeasurable Distance.


Conversation with Matthew Day Jackson and David Mindell (90 minutes)
May 9, 2009

MIT Professor David A. Mindell's recent book Digital Apollo, (MIT Press) examines issues related to the human-machine interface in the development of the Apollo space program. Artist Matthew Day Jackson and Mindell will engage in a discussion of those issues and the themes expressed in Jackson's List Center exhibition, The Immeasurable Distance. Mindell is Dibner Professor of the History of Engineering and Manufacturing, Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT. In developing works for the exhibition at MIT Jackson worked with Mindell in researching ideas during his artist residency at MIT. This conversation was moderated by exhibition curator Bill Arning.

 

Conversation with Bill Arning on Matthew Day Jackson's exhibition, The Immeasurable Distance (73 minutes)
April 29, 2009

Organized by Bill Arning, in this exhibition Jackson continues his investigations into human consciousness and explores how positive evolutionary developments in human thought and culture occur under physical or mental stress. Other works explore how constructive and destructive technological developments often stem from a similar impetus: to expand human experience despite all odds, proving that progress is possible, whatever the risk.


Conversation with artists Taylor Davis and Nicole Cherubini (50 min)
February 5, 2009

Opening reception conversation with artists Taylor Davis and Nicole Cherubini. Davis and Cherubini are both established sculptors who are making important contributions to the field today. Since 2006 they have been making works together under the name Davis, Cherubini—their two surnames separated by a comma (to read more like a list than as an independent author.) As independent artists they shared a way of working with materials and forms derived from functional arts. In many cases Davis’s works appear to have been built by a woodworker, while Cherubini often works with vessel-like forms and uses clay among other materials to conjure iconic images of pots.

Algeria in France: A Talk by Paul A. Silverstein (99 minutes)
December 11, 2008

Silverstein, associate professor of anthropology at Reed College and Carnegie Scholar, is author of Algeria in France: Transpolitics, Race and Nation (Indiana, 2004) and discusses the complex relationship of Algeria to France, focusing on the lives of Algerian immigrants in contemporary French culture. This program was presented in conjunction with the List Center's exhibition Adel Abdessemed: Situation and Practice.

Lecture And Book-Signing With Paul D. Miller Aka Dj Spooky That Subliminal Kid
(98 minutes)
October 24, 2008

In Sound Unbound (MIT Press, 2008), Miller author of Rhythm Science, asks thirty-six artists to describe their work and compositional strategies. Contributors include: Pierre Boulez, Dick Hebdige, Beryl Korot, Moby, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Pauline Oliveros, Philippe Parreno, Ibrahim Quraishi, and Steve Reich. Miller's lecture features historic texts, rare audio recordings, and films, to demonstrate the complex relationship between text and art in a multimedia context.

Conversation With Artist Adel Abdessemed And Curator Jane Farver (77 minutes)
October 10, 2008

A conversation at the exhibition's opening between curator Jane Farver and artist Adel Abdessemed. Abdessemed refuses to be limited to a single ideology or medium—he works across video, animation, performance, and sculptural installation. He passionately tackled religious, sexual and hallucinogenic taboos subjects in his early works and his later exhibitions have often focused on the theme of global violence.

Akerman in Her Many Contexts (75 minutes)
June 26, 2008

Akerman in Her Many Contexts
, this talk by LVAC curator Bill Arning, provides an in-depth examination of Chantal Akerman’s work as a filmmaker and an artist. Chantal Akerman is widely regarded as one of the most important directors in film history. Since 1995 Akerman’s artistic practice has melded documentary filmmaking techniques with video installation. Arning explores her work in the crossover genre of film and visual art.

Lavine Lecture: Talk with Jeffrey Weiss: Light Trap for Dan Flavin (1 hr, 23 min)
July 16, 2008

This talk will represent Dan Flavin's landmark Green Gallery exhibition in 1964 as a dividing point in the development of his work. Focusing on the precise nature of the fluorescent lamp (both the object and the light) as Flavin's sole medium, it will bracket Flavin in the context of the rise of so-called minimal art, seeking instead to position his early work within a more complex historical narrative centered on the re-emergence of Marcel Duchamp as an art world figure in New York circa 1960.

 

Artist Talk with Mary Lucier:  Part 1 (61 minutes) Part 2 (52 minutes)

February 21, 2008

Mary Lucier's piece, Arabesque, was on view on the Media Test Wall in the Stata Center at MIT.  Lucier was born in Bucyrus, Ohio in 1944. She received a B.A. from Brandeis University in 1965, and moved to New York City in 1974, around the time that she began working in video. She has been the recipient of many prestigious awards including the Skowhegan Medal for Video, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an American Film Institute Independent Filmmaker Grant. She has also received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts. This piece was presented in conjunction with the David Claerbout exhibition.
 
Conversation between artist David Claerbout and LVAC curator Bill Arning
(60 minutes)
February 8, 2008

Since 1996, David Claerbout (b. Kortrijk, Belgium, 1969) has created works that navigate between the still and the moving image and between photographic and digital techniques. He has developed a type of photography in motion, a "moving still," into which, since 2004, he has introduced narrative elements. Filmed in architectural settings representative of modern culture and the contemporary urban context, Claerbout's works often explore the passage of time and the unfolding of space. This is a conversation between curator Bill Arning and Claerbout at the prior to the opening reception of his exhibition.

 
Sounding the Subject: Artist's Talk by Joan Jonas (75 minutes)
December 4, 2007

An artist's talk by Joan Jonas as part of the Sounding the Subject exhibition. Born in 1936 in New York City, Joan Jonas is a pioneer of video and performance art and one of the most important female artists to emerge in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Jonas' projects and experiments provided the foundation on which much video performance art would be based. Her influences also extended to conceptual art, theatre performance and other visual media. In 1994, Jonas was honored with a major retrospective at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam in which she transformed several of her performance works into installations for the museum. In 2003 she had solo exhibitions at Rosamund Felsen in Los Angeles and the Pat Hearn Gallery in New York City

Sounding the Subject: Artist's Talk by Stan Douglas (86 minutes)
November 8, 2007

An artist's talk with Stan Douglass, one of the artists featured in the Sounding the Subjects exhibition. This exhibition considers the use of sound, the human voice, and theatrical performance by five artists in major pieces that are drawn from the collections of Pamela and Richard Kramlich and the New Art Trust. The artists featured in the exhibition are Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Stan Douglas, David Hammons, Nam June Paik, and Pipilotti Rist. This exhibition was organized by curators Daniel Birnbaum, Rector of the Städelschule Art Academy and Director, the Portikus Gallery in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, and Mechtild Widrich, Ph.D. candidate in MIT's History, Theory, and Criticism program.

 

Sounding the Subject: Artist's Talk by Allora & Calzadilla (95 minutes)
October 31, 2007

An artists' talk by  as part of the Sounding the Subject exhibition. This exhibition considers the use of sound, the human voice, and theatrical performance by five artists in major pieces that are drawn from the collections of Pamela and Richard Kramlich and the New Art Trust. The artists featured in the exhibition are Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Stan Douglas, David Hammons, Nam June Paik, and Pipilotti Rist. This exhibition was organized by curators Daniel Birnbaum, Rector of the Städelschule Art Academy and Director, the Portikus Gallery in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, and Mechtild Widrich, Ph.D. candidate in MIT's History, Theory, and Criticism program.

 

Talk by Daniel Birnbaum, curator of Sounding the Subject (58 minutes)
October 20, 2007

Since 2001, Daniel Birnbaum has been Rector of the Staedelschule in Frankfurt-am-Main in Germany, an international academy bringing together traditional and contemporary art and the development of new processes and techniques. He acted as the curator for the List Center’s Sounding the Subject exhibition along with and Mechtild Widrich, Ph.D. candidate in MIT's History, Theory, and Criticism program. Sounding the Subject considers the use of sound, the human voice, and theatrical performance by five artists in major pieces that are drawn from the collections of Pamela and Richard Kramlich and the New Art Trust. The artists featured in the exhibition are Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Stan Douglas, David Hammons, Nam June Paik, and Pipilotti Rist.  

 

America’s Fascination with Pro-Wrestling (89 minutes)
May 30, 2007

A lecture by Sam Ford, MIT Comparative Media Studies graduate student, as past of the Cameron Jamie exhibition. Cameron Jamie has created a body of work centering around film and performance that documents various fringe rituals, including backyard teenage wresting, Halloween spook houses, eating contests, and a winter visitation by mythical beasts. Working across materials and media, he frequently collaborates with street-portrait artists and celebrity impersonators as well as musicians such as The Melvins and Japanese guitarist Keiji Haino. The resulting work conflates investigative strategies, autobiography, mythologies, vernacular traditions, and urban folklore to examine contemporary life, our fascinations with the outlandish, and our need for escapism - what one critic has identified as "backyard anthropology" or what the artist calls, "social theater."

 

A Talk with Robin Blaetz (90 minutes)
May 22, 2007


A talk by Robin Blaetz, author of Visions of the Maid as part of the Cameron Jamie exhibition. Cameron Jamie has created a body of work centering around film and performance that documents various fringe rituals, including backyard teenage wresting, Halloween spook houses, eating contests, and a winter visitation by mythical beasts. Working across materials and media, he frequently collaborates with street-portrait artists and celebrity impersonators as well as musicians such as The Melvins and Japanese guitarist Keiji Haino. The resulting work conflates investigative strategies, autobiography, mythologies, vernacular traditions, and urban folklore to examine contemporary life, our fascinations with the outlandish, and our need for escapism - what one critic has identified as "backyard anthropology" or what the artist calls, "social theater."

 

Lavine Lecture: Talk with Christine Mehring (82 minutes)
May 8, 2007

 

Christine Mehring is an Assistant Professor of the History of Art at Yale University in New Haven. She received her BA from the University of Lüneberg, Germany, her Master's from State University of New York at Stony Brook in Art History and Criticism and another from Harvard University, Fine Arts, where she also completed her PhD. Mehring works on 20th century European art and photography, postwar American art, and contemporary art. She is completing a book on the German abstract painter Blinky Palermo, co-editing an anthology of postwar European art, and working on a study of abstraction and decoration in the 20th century.

 

Sensorium Pt. 2: Talk with Marquard Smith: Redefining the Prosthetically Enhanced Body (94 minutes)

April 24, 2007

 

This two-part exhibition organized by the MIT LVAC, explores various ways in which contemporary artists address the influence of technology on the sense. The impact of new technology has reshuffled the established hierarchy of the senses and radically changed people's lives. Remote sensing via telephones and screens are fundamental parts of the daily sensorium (a Latin term that connotes ancient and often theological debates about mind and body, word and flesh, human and artificial). The art in Sensorium captures the aesthetic attitude of this hybrid moment when modernist segmentation of the senses is giving way to dramatic multi-sensory mixes or transpositions. The artists in this exhibition respond and question the implications of this significant epochal shift.

 

Sensorium Pt. 2: Talk with Marvin Minsky (100 minutes)

April 5, 2007

 

This two-part exhibition organized by the MIT LVAC, explores various ways in which contemporary artists address the influence of technology on the sense. The impact of new technology has reshuffled the established hierarchy of the senses and radically changed people's lives. Remote sensing via telephones and screens are fundamental parts of the daily sensorium (a Latin term that connotes ancient and often theological debates about mind and body, word and flesh, human and artificial). The art in Sensorium captures the aesthetic attitude of this hybrid moment when modernist segmentation of the senses is giving way to dramatic multi-sensory mixes or transpositions. The artists in this exhibition respond and question the implications of this significant epochal shift.

 

Sensorium Pt. 2: Michelle Kuo: Structure as Sensorium (79 minutes)

March 9, 2007

 

This two-part exhibition organized by the MIT LVAC, explores various ways in which contemporary artists address the influence of technology on the sense. The impact of new technology has reshuffled the established hierarchy of the senses and radically changed people's lives. Remote sensing via telephones and screens are fundamental parts of the daily sensorium (a Latin term that connotes ancient and often theological debates about mind and body, word and flesh, human and artificial). The art in Sensorium captures the aesthetic attitude of this hybrid moment when modernist segmentation of the senses is giving way to dramatic multi-sensory mixes or transpositions. The artists in this exhibition respond and question the implications of this significant epochal shift.

 

Sensorium Pt. 2: Artists and Curators Panel (146 minutes)

February 9, 2007

 

A panel discussion with artists Natascha Sadr-Haghighian and François Roche; Sensorium curators Jane Farver, Yuko Hasegawa, and Marjory Jacobson; and moderator Caroline A. Jones, editor of Sensorium: Embodied Experience, Technology, and Contemporary Art.

This two-part exhibition (Sensorium Part I and Part II) organized by the List Center explores various ways in which contemporary artists address the influence of technology on the sense. The impact of new technology has reshuffled the established hierarchy of the senses and radically changed people's lives. Remote sensing via telephones and screens are fundamental parts of the daily sensorium (a Latin term that connotes ancient and often theological debates about mind and body, word and flesh, human and artificial). The art in Sensorium captures the aesthetic attitude of this hybrid moment when modernist segmentation of the senses is giving way to dramatic multi-sensory mixes or transpositions. The artists in this exhibition respond and question the implications of this significant epochal shift.

 

Sensorium Pt. 1: A Public Discussion  Part 1 (55 minutes)  Part 2 (43 minutes)

October 13, 2006

 

This talk features a panel discussion with artists Mathieu Briand, Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, and Sissel Tolaas; Sensorium curators Bill Arning, Jane Farver, Marjory Jacobson; and moderator Caroline A. Jones, editor of Sensorium: Embodied Experience, Technology, and Contemporary Art

 

This two-part exhibition (Sensorium Part I and Part II) organized by the List Center explores various ways in which contemporary artists address the influence of technology on the sense. The impact of new technology has reshuffled the established hierarchy of the senses and radically changed people's lives. Remote sensing via telephones and screens are fundamental parts of the daily sensorium (a Latin term that connotes ancient and often theological debates about mind and body, word and flesh, human and artificial). The art in Sensorium captures the aesthetic attitude of this hybrid moment when modernist segmentation of the senses is giving way to dramatic multi-sensory mixes or transpositions. The artists in this exhibition respond and question the implications of this significant epochal shift.

 

Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
   1 2 34-3-2014
Curator's Final Thoughts Tour
4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 124-12-2014
Slow Art Day
13 14 15 164-16-2014
In-Gallery Chat with Andrea Sutton
174-17-2014
Thursday @ the List
18 19
20 21 224-22-2014
Family Week at the List: Nature
234-23-2014
Family Week at the List: Geometry
244-24-2014
Family Week at the List: Architecture
254-25-2014
Family Week at the List: Color and Texture
26
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