Past Programs

Otto Piene: Lichtballett 

Hans Haacke 1967

October 21-December 31, 2011

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, October 20, 2011

Artist Talks 5:30PM

Pre-reception Artist Talks with Otto Piene and LVAC curator João Ribas

Hans Haacke, and Boston University Professor Greg Williams

Bartos Theatre, Building E-15


Friday, October 21, 6:30PM, Building 7-431

After the Fact:

A Conversation with Hans Haacke, Caroline A. Jones and Mark Jarzombek

(organized by MIT’s History, Theory and Criticism Department)


Friday, October 21, 7PM, Bartos Theatre, Bldg E-15

Documentary Fictions:  the Otolith Group in Conversation with TJ Demos

Curated by Scott Berzofsky, ACT Masters Candidate 2012


Saturday, October 22, 11AM

Tour of MIT’s Public Art Collection by Alise Upitis, LVAC public art curator

Raindate: Sunday, October 23, 11AM


Wednesday, October 26, 12:30PM

Lunchtime Gallery Talk by LVAC educator Mark Linga


The MIT List Visual Arts Center is pleased to collaborate with the Goethe-Institut Boston to present two rarely screened films and videos featuring the work of Otto Piene.

Thursday, November 3, 7PM

Otto Piene Films/Videos
Goethe-Institut Boston
170 Beacon Street, Boston
Admission free
Info: +1 (617) 262-6050 or (617) 452-3586
 

 

Olympia Regenbogen/Olympic Rainbow (1972)

Dir., Muri Selle, approx. 20 minutes, color

The film Olympia Regenbogen/Olympic Rainbow (1972) was first intended by Piene as a means to both document his eponymous work of "Sky Art" for the 1972 Munich Olympics and provide an entry to the aesthetic and experience of the live event. Unexpectedly, the film also documents the audience's experience, who had days earlier witnessed the mediatized deaths of 11 Israeli athletes being held hostage. The artwork was a multicolored helium-inflated sculpture installed for the closing ceremony of the Games, consisting of five horizontal, parallel polyethylene tubes, with each tube appearing in one of the five colors of the Munich Games. When fully inflated, the sculpture formed an arch 2000 feet long, the rainbow stretching over the Gunther Behnisch-designed Olympic Stadium. As the stadium's structural form--acrylic glass canopies secured by metal ropes--was architectonically pioneering, Piene's Olympic Rainbow is the largest and most difficult work of art the artist has created. Its success was made possible in part by Walter Lewin, an MIT physics professor and authority on balloon-born X-ray astronomy. 

 

Black Gate Cologne. Ein Lichtspeil (1968/69)

Otto Piene/Aldo Tambellini, 47 minutes, b/w mono

Black Gate Cologne. Ein Lichtspeil (1968/69) was the result of a collaboration between Otto Piene and Aldo Tambellini and is historically noted as being the first joint production by artists working with television.  This Cologne-based WDR German television production allowed Piene and Tambellini to build on concepts developed in an earlier multimedia live action event BLACK Air.  That work had been performed in the Black Gate, a theater in New York opened by the artists in spring of 1967. Produced in 1968, and subsequently broadcast in 1969, Black Gate Cologne. Ein Lichtspeil brought together such diverse elements as happenings, studio audience interaction, Piene’s light sculptures, and Tambellini’s layering of transparencies, film, and video imagery to create a new electronic, visually charged work. The production utilized five studio cameras, eleven sources of image and sound material emerging from eleven monitors, four projection screens, and large loudspeakers to create a 47 minute recording. This is the original director’s cut; editors at the station cut the length of the program to 27 minutes for its final broadcast version.


Saturday, November 5, 2PM

Gallery Talk by LVAC educator Mark Linga


Wednesday, November 9, 12:30PM

Lunchtime Gallery Talk by LVAC curator João Ribas

 

Otto Piene Films/Videos

Friday, November 11, 7PM

Wiesner Building, E15

20 Ames St., Cambridge MA

Lower atrium level:  Bartos Theatre

 

Olympia Regenbogen/Olympic Rainbow (1972)

Dir., Muri Selle, approx. 20 minutes, color

The film Olympia Regenbogen/Olympic Rainbow (1972) was first intended by Piene as a means to both document his eponymous work of "Sky Art" for the 1972 Munich Olympics and provide an entry to the aesthetic and experience of the live event. Unexpectedly, the film also documents the audience's experience, who had days earlier witnessed the mediatized deaths of 11 Israeli athletes being held hostage. The artwork was a multicolored helium-inflated sculpture installed for the closing ceremony of the Games, consisting of five horizontal, parallel polyethylene tubes and with each tube appearing in one of the five colors of the Munich Games. When fully inflated, the sculpture formed an arch 2000 feet long, the rainbow stretching over the Gunther Behnisch-designed Olympic Stadium. As the stadium's structural form--acrylic glass canopies secured by metal ropes--was architectonically pioneering, Piene's Olympic Rainbow is the largest and most difficult work of art the artist has created. Its success was made possible in part by Walter Lewin, an MIT physics professor and authority on balloon-born X-ray astronomy. 

 

The Medium is the Medium, (1969)

Produced by WGBH. Executive Producer: David Oppenheim. Producers: Ann Gresser, Pat Marx. Director: Fred Barzyk. 

Produced by WGBH-TV in Boston, The Medium is the Medium is one of the earliest and most prescient examples of the collaboration between television and the emerging field of video art in the United States. WGBH commissioned six visual artists: Allan Kaprow, Nam June Paik, Otto Piene, James Seawright, Thomas Tadlock and Aldo Tambellini to create original works for broadcast television. Piene’s “Electronic Light Ballet” featured a young woman levitated with hot-air balloons against a backdrop of video feedback and colorful designs.  In pursuing their individual aesthetics, these artists produced works that explored the parameters of the new medium, from image processing and interactivity to video, dance, and sculpture.

 

Lichtspur im Haus der Sonne (1975)

43 minutes

Lichtspur im Haus der Sonne (Light Trail in the house of the Sun) is a film documentation of several one-time, environmentally specific events created by Otto Piene in Hawaii.  The film includes Piene’s Light Trail, a site specific installation, Tent 2 a sky art event, and Lava Dance, a performance in which four dancers interpret the elements of water, fire, air, and earth.


Wednesday, November 16, 12:30 PM

Lunchtime Gallery Talk by LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Thursday, November 17

Bartos Theatre, 7PM

Group Zero

A Talk by Joseph D. Ketner II


Joseph D. Ketner II is the Henry Lois Foster Chair in Contemporary Art Theory and Practice, Distinguished Curator-in-Residence Emerson College, Boston.  Ketner has been conducting research and focusing on the German Gruppe Zero (Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, and Günther Uecker) with a particular focus on their formative role in the transformation of art in post-World War II Europe.  Recently Ketner, published an essay for Heinz Mack’s exhibition at Sperone Westwater Gallery, New York (2011).  He also assisted Otto Piene on the recreation of a slide projection performance of Proliferation of the Sun and a Sky Art event (2010-2011). 


Wednesday, November 30, 12:30PM

Lunchtime Gallery Talk by Caroline A. Jones


Caroline A. Jones, the director of the History, Theory, and Criticism Program and professor of art history at MIT, studies modern and contemporary art, with a particular focus on its technological modes of production, distribution, and reception.  She is the curator of Hans Haacke 1967. 


Thursday, December 1, 6PM

Gallery Talk by Art Historian Martha Buskirk

Professor Martha Buskirk will lead a gallery tour of Hans Haacke 1967.

 

Martha Buskirk will lead a gallery tour of Hans Haacke 1967. Martha Buskirk is Professor of art history and criticism at Montserrat College of Art in Beverly, Massachusetts, where she has taught since 1994. She is author of The Contingent Object of Contemporary Art (MIT Press, 2003) and has recently completed a new book, Perilous Success: Contemporary Art between Museum and Marketplace (forthcoming, Continuum, spring 2012). She is also co-editor of The Duchamp Effect, with Mignon Nixon (MIT Press, 1996) and The Destruction of Tilted Arc: Documents (MIT Press, 1990), with Clara Weyergraf-Serra.


Saturday, December 3, 2PM

Gallery Talk by LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Visions & Projections — An Evening Celebrating the Legacy of the Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS)

Thursday, December 8, 6-8PM

MIT Cube, Wiesner Building (E15-001)
20 Ames Street, Cambridge, MA, USA

 

PROGRAM
Lecture: Márton Orosz, Curator and György Kepes Fellow for Advanced Studies and Transdisciplinary Research in Art, Culture and Technology
Screening: Centerbeam, Directed by Richard Leacock and Jon Rubin. CAVS 1978, 16 mm, color, 13 min.
Round table discussion:
Otto Piene, Professor and CAVS Director Emeritus
Elizabeth Goldring, former CAVS Co-Director and ACT Fellow
Joan Brigham, former CAVS Fellow
Lowry Burgess, former CAVS Fellow
Alejandro Siña, former CAVS Fellow
Aldo Tambellini, former CAVS Fellow
Moderated by João Ribas, Curator, List Visual Arts Center

 

György Kepes founded CAVS in 1967 at MIT as a fellowship program for artists, which advanced “cooperative projects aimed at the creation of monumental scale environmental forms” while fostering the “individual creative pursuits” of the artists involved. In his lecture, Márton Orosz, who is currently writing a monograph on Kepes, will focus on the role and function of visual design as a form of social engagement in urban, large-scale environments. The second part of the program highlights the CAVS mission under Otto Piene’s directorship, and will focus on transdisciplinary collaborations such as Centerbeam. The newly restored documentary of the same title, co-directed by the late MIT Professor Richard Leacock, traces the large-scale collaborative sculpture Centerbeam, which combined a 144-foot long water prism, holography, and projections on steam. Centerbeam was commissioned and installed at Documenta 6, Kassel, Germany, in 1977, and on the National Mall in Washington, DC in 1978. The discussion will consider the production, vision, and social engagement of Centerbeam.

 

The György Kepes Fellowship for Advanced Studies and Transdisciplinary Research in Art, Culture and Technology is a joint initiative of the MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology (ACT), tranzit.org and ERSTE Foundation. The preservation of Centerbeam is supported in part by the National Film Preservation Foundation's Avant-Garde Masters Grant program funded by The Film Foundation.

 

Wednesday, December 14, 12:30PM

Lunchtime Gallery Talk by LVAC curator João Ribas

 

Thursday, December 15, 6PM

I ♥ Neutrinos 

A Film Screening by Jennifer West

Bartos, Theatre

Wiesner Building E-15, lower atrium level

 

Artist/filmmaker Jennifer West recently completed an artist residency project at MIT. West ‘s collaborative engagement with faculty and researchers in MIT’s  Laboratory for Nuclear Science and the Center for Materials Science and Engineering, X-Ray Shared Experimental Facility resulted in the creation of three new “cameraless” film works. These works serve as a portrait of MIT through the unique materials and laboratory processes West used to create the films.  West will screen the new works and discuss her residency experiences at MIT.

 

About the Artist

Los Angeles-based artist Jennifer West makes 16mm, 35mm, and 70mm films by manipulating the film celluloid to a level of performance. The film emulsion might be doused with various chemical agents or subjected to physical manipulation. The concept-specific materials she employs for each film enhance and reinforce the experiential and performative nature of each work. She often makes her work with social groupings such as friends, students, artists, and writers. Her silent films have a strong synesthetic effect, indicative of the "ingredients" or processes that led to her particular visual expression. She is also known for her "Zines" - DIY photo booklets of production stills of the making of the films- that she gives away at her exhibitions. Her recent exhibitions include "Perspectives 176: Jennifer West" at the Contemporary Arts Museum in Houston, "The Cameraless Film" at the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, "Update No. 2" at White Columns, NYC and "How Soon Now" at the Rubell Family Collection. She has been commissioned for special projects and exhibitions at MIT List Visual Arts Center, The Aspen Art Museum and at The TATE Modern.


Saturday, December 17, 2PM

Gallery Talk by LVAC educator Mark Linga


Wednesday, December 21, 12:30PM

 Lunchtime Gallery Talk by LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

 

The annual Max Wasserman Forum on Contemporary Art: Present Past: Contemporary Art and the Uses of History

Sunday, October 9, 2011

 

77 Massachusetts Avenue Building 10, Room 250

 

Panelists: Matthew Buckingham, Jaleh Mansoor, Dieter Roelstraete, Danh Vo

Moderator: Tim Griffin

 

The MIT List Visual Arts Center is pleased to present the annual Max Wasserman Forum on Contemporary Art on Sunday, October 9 at 3PM.  This year’s Forum, Present Past: Contemporary Art and the Uses of History, concerns how artists working with historical subject matter engage theories and methods of historical research.

 

“To be historical,” wrote philosopher Paul Ricoeur, “an event must be more than a singular occurrence, a unique happening. It receives its definition from its contribution to the development of a plot.” If narrative is central to written history, what might Ricoeur's statement mean for artistic practices that operate with historical materials, such as archives or found objects, or for artistic practices that use historical theories themselves as subject matter? What of the connection between historical and fictional narratives? In what ways can artistic practices open a space to question the status of whose narrative is being articulated? More generally, what are the articulations of the relationship between contemporary art and an interest in historical phenomena? Can current artistic practices prompt a new sense of historical time, one reflected in a relationship to the contemporary as a category of the present that is, in itself already, historical?

 

These and related questions will be considered by panelists Matthew Buckingham, Jaleh Mansoor, Dieter Roelstraete, Danh Vo, and moderator Tim Griffin as they discuss how artists use historical material in their work, how they engage theories and methods of historical research, and how artistic practice can call into question the status of historical narratives and received notions of historical time.     

 

The annual Max Wasserman Forum on Contemporary Art was established in memory of Max Wasserman (MIT Class of 1935), a founding member of the Council for the Arts at MIT. This public forum was endowed through the generosity of the late Jeanne Wasserman and addresses critical issues in contemporary art and culture through the participation of renowned scholars, artists, and arts professionals. The Forum is organized and presented by the MIT List Visual Arts Center.

 

 

The Other Night Sky: Destiny, Warfare, and Ruins Among the Stars: An artist Talk by Trevor Paglen

Friday, September 30, 2011

7:00PM

Bartos Theatre

Social scientist, artist, writer, and provocateur, Trevor Paglen has been exploring the secret activities of the US military and intelligence agencies--the "black world"--for the last eight years, publishing, speaking, and making astonishing photographs.

 

As an artist, Paglen is interested in the idea of photography as truth-telling, but his pictures often stop short of traditional ideas of documentation. In the series Limit Telephotography, for example, he employs high-end optical systems to photograph top-secret governmental sites; and in The Other Night Sky, he uses the data of amateur satellite watchers to track and photograph classified spacecraft in Earth's orbit. In other works Paglen transforms documents such as passports, flight data, and aliases of CIA operatives into art objects.

 

The MIT List Visual Arts Center is hosting Trevor Paglen as an artist in residence at MIT. This program is sponsored by The MIT Artists in Residence (AiR) Program.

 

 

The Otolith Trilogy

September 6-22, 2011

12:00PM - 6:00PM

Bakalar Gallery

Screening Times:

Otolith I: 12:10PM

Otolith II: 12:40PM 

Otolith III: 1:30PM 

Otolith I: 2:30PM 

Otolith II: 3:00PM 

Otolith III: 3:50PM 

Otolith I: 4:50PM

 

For more information about this program, please visit http://listart.mit.edu/node/844

 

 

From Sociological Art to the Aesthetics of Communication: a Lecture by Fred Forest

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

6:30PM

Bartos Theatre

French media artist and theorist Fred Forest (born in 1933) is one of the earliest pioneers of video and media art. His work with interactive environments using computer and video elements, began as early as 1968. At the forefront of interactive art and new media, sociology, and institutional critique, his work frequently immaterial and relational, raises questions about the nature and function of art in a market-driven age of information. A retrospective of his work was held at the Slought Foundation in Philadelphia in 2007. Forest has exhibited and presented at institutions including, the Centre Georges Pompidou, Espace Pierre Cardin, and the Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Currently artist in residence in New York at Residency Unlimited supported by the Institut Francais, Fred Forest is implementing a global interactive project at the Centre d'art Albi, France and has several upcoming projects scheduled in the United States August and September.

 

The List Visual Arts Center wishes to thank The Cultural Service of the French Consulate in Boston, Residency Unlimited, and the MIT-France Program for their generous assistance in making this talk possible.

 

 

Student Loan Art Program: Graduate Student Reception

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

5:00 - 7:00PM

Hayden & Reference Galleries

See the amazing selection of artworks from the Student Loan Art Collection of the List Visual Arts Center -- you can borrow an artwork for your living space, if you are one of the lucky 500(+) to win the lottery! 
MIT graduate students are invited to view 500(+) prints and photographs that are available for them to borrow for the year. Enter the lottery and enjoy food and beverages!

LIVE MUSIC BY DJ JESSE KAMINSKY HOST OF WMBR’S THE INTERCONTINENTAL

 

 

The 2011 Student Loan Art Program Exhibition and Lottery

September 6-18, 2011

Open Daily, 12:00PM - 6:00PM

Hayden & Reference Galleries

 

 

Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect

May 5, 2011 - july 10, 2011

 

Opening Reception

Wednesday, May 4, 6-8pm

 

Reception preceded by a conversation with catalogue essayist

Gustavo Buntinx and Marilys Belt de Downey, moderated by curator Valerie Smith

5:30 PM in the Bartos Theatre

 

 

Lunchtime Gallery Talks:

Wednesday, May 11, 12:30PM

Gallery talk with LVAC director Jane Farver

 

Wednesday, May 25, 12:30PM

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Wednesday, June 8, 12:30PM

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Wednesday, June 29, 12:30PM

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Wednesday, July 6, 12:30PM

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

 

Gallery Talks:

Saturday, May 21, 2PM

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Saturday, June 11, 2PM

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Saturday, July 9, 2PM

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

 

Public Art Tours:

Saturday, May 21, 11AM

Tour of MIT's Public Art Collection

with LVAC public art curator Alise Upitis

 

Saturday, June 25, 11AM

Tour of MIT's Public Art Collection

with LVAC public art curator Alise Upitis

 

Video Trans Americas: A Talk by John Hanhardt

Thursday, June 23, 7PM, Bartos Theatre

John G. Hanhardt is consulting senior curator for the Nam June Paik Media Arts Center at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Since beginning his career at the Department of Film at the Museum of Modern Art, he has organized film and media arts programming and exhibitions at the Walker Art Center, the Whitney Museum of Modern Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. John Hanhardt met Juan Downey in the early 1970s and his first project with the artist at the Whitney Museum of American Art, in 1976, was the large-scale media-art installation Video Trans Americas. Hanhardt will share his thoughts on this seminal work and his relationship with the artist.

 

 

Stan VanDerBeek: The Culture Intercom

February 4, 2011 - April 3, 2011

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, February 3, 6-8pm

 

Pre-reception panel discussion 5:30pm, Bartos Theatre


Prior to the opening reception for Stan VanDerBeek: The Culture Intercom, the List Visual Arts Center is pleased to present a panel discussion with Bill Arning, Director, Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, Johannes VanDerBeek, and Sara VanDerBeek. This pre-reception talk will be moderated by LVAC curator João Ribas, and will take place in Bartos Theatre.

 

Lunchtime Gallery Talks:

Wednesday, February 16, 12:30pm

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Wednesday, March 9, 12:30pm

Gallery talk with LVAC curator João Ribas

 

Wednesday, March 23, 12:30pm

Gallery talk with LVAC director Jane Farver

 

Gallery Talks:

Saturday, February 19, 2pm

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Saturday, March 19, 2pm

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Saturday, April 2, 2pm

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Public Art Tour:

Saturday, March 19, 11am

Tour of MIT's Public Art Collection


MIT FAST 150 Festival Event
February 4, 2011, 1 - 5PM

Systems, Process, Art, and the Social
Stata Center, Room 123
This panel examines the long shadow of cybernetics and systems theory in art and design from the 1950s until today, with particular focus on its shift toward the social. How do we get from wartime simulators to contemporary architectural algorithms and interactivity? What does the weather have to do with philosophies of reception in contemporary art? When does an architecture pavilion become a recursive semiotic universe? Scholars, artists, and designers look at the aesthetic and programmatic impact of ideas that at first appeared to have nothing to do with art, and that may have had their most intense articulation (if not their origin) at MIT during and after the war.
 
Moderator:
Caroline A. Jones, professor and director, History/Theory/Cricitism, Architecture, MIT
Participants:
-Benjamin Aranda of "Terraswarm" architecture firm, New York
-Michelle Kuo, editor of Artforum & scholar of "Experiments in Art and Technology"
-João Ribas, curator of exhibitions at MIT List Visual Arts Center
-Matthew Ritchie, artist of The Morning Line pavilion for Thyssen-Bornemisza Contemporary
-Matthew Wisnioski, professor at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University & scholar of engineer-artists in the 1960s 

 

Stan VanDerBeek: The Culture Intercom

Film Night 

February 17, 2011, 7PM


Stan VanDerBeek's film work is now regarded as one of the most significant contributions to American underground film. Influenced by Surrealism and Dada, the Beat Generation, and the cinema of Georges Méliès and Buster Keaton, VanDerBeek's earliest films utilized stop-motion animation skills he developed while working on the CBS children's television program, Winky Dink and You. Combining innovative animation techniques with filmed sequences and found footage, award-winning films such as A La Mode (1958), Science Friction, (1959), and Breathdeath (1963), fused experimental film with social critique and anti-war imagery. VanDerBeek incorporated animated collages, live action, found footage, and stop-motion in his widely imaginative films throughout the '60s.

Post screening discussion moderated by LVAC curator João Ribas.
This screening will present additional film works not on view in the exhibition.

 

A conversation with LVAC curator João Ribas and former MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS) director, and artist Otto Piene
February 24, 2011, 6PM, bartos theatre

 

Internationally respected sculptor Otto Piene succeeded Professor Gyorgy Kepes as director of the CAVS at MIT in 1974. In his nearly 20 years as director of the Center, Piene built on the legacy of Kepes by fostering a creative collaboration of artists, scientists, and engineers at the center, including Stan VanDerBeek.  Piene will share his thoughts on VanDerBeek's work in the context of the Center's mission. 

 

Violence Sonata: A Gallery Talk by Fred Barzyk & David Atwood, WGBH Television
march 10, 2011, 6PM

 

In 1970 WGBH television worked with VanDerBeek to produce Violence Sonata, a mix of live studio television transmission and prerecorded video work that questioned violence and race relations in America. Fred Barzyk and David Atwood served as the directors for the televised production and broadcast.  This talk will highlight WGBH's involvement in this significant experiment in early new media art. 

 

Steam Screens & Under Aquarius: A Talk by Artist Joan Brigham
march 17, 2011, 6PM, Bartos Theatre

 

A Research Fellow from 1974-1999 at MIT's Center for Advanced Visual Studies, and Professor Emeritus in Fine art, Emerson College, environmental artist Joan Brigham  pioneered the use of steam in her work. She participated in 1977 documenta 6 in Kassel Germany, with Centerbeam and worked on a number of works collaboratively with Stan VanDerBeek including Steam Screens and Under Aquarius.  Brigham will discuss these works and her collaborative relationship with VanDerBeek. 

 

Stan VanDerBeek: The Culture Intercom

Film Night 

march 31, 2011, 7PM


Stan VanDerBeek's film work is now regarded as one of the most significant contributions to American underground film. Influenced by Surrealism and Dada, the Beat Generation, and the cinema of Georges Méliès and Buster Keaton, VanDerBeek's earliest films utilized stop-motion animation skills he developed while working on the CBS children's television program, Winky Dink and You. Combining innovative animation techniques with filmed sequences and found footage, award-winning films such as A La Mode (1958), Science Friction, (1959), and Breathdeath (1963), fused experimental film with social critique and anti-war imagery. VanDerBeek incorporated animated collages, live action, found footage, and stop-motion in his widely imaginative films throughout the '60s.

This screening will present additional film works not on view in the exhibition.

 

 

Frances Stark: This could become a gimick [sic] or an honest articulation of the workings

of the mind

Emily Wardill: Game Keepers Without Game

Melvin Moti: The Prisoner’s Cinema

OcTOber 22, 2010 - January 2, 2011

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, October 21, 6-8pm

 

Pre-reception artist talk with Frances Stark. 5:30pm, Bartos Theatre


Prior the to the opening reception for Frances Stark: This could become a gimick [sic] or an honest articulation of the workings of the mind, Emily Wardill: Game Keepers Without Game, and Melvin Moti: The Prisoner’s Cinema, the List Visual Arts Center is pleased to present an artist talk with exhibiting artist Frances Stark.

 

This pre-reception talk is moderated by LVAC curator João Ribas.

 

Lunchtime Gallery Talks:

Wednesday, October 27, 12:30pm

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Wednesday, November 10, 12:30pm

Gallery talk with LVAC curator João Ribas

 

Wednesday, December 8, 12:30pm

Gallery talk with LVAC director Jane Farver

 

Gallery Talks:

Thursday, October 28, 6pm

Gallery talk with LVAC curator João Ribas

 

Saturday, November 13, 2pm

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Wednesday, November 17, 6pm

Gallery talk with exhibiting artist Melvin Moti

 

Thursday, December 2, 7pm

Talk by MIT Professor Alex Byrne

 

Thursday, December 9, 6pm

Gallery talk with LVAC curator João Ribas

 

Saturday, December 18, 2pm

Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Public Art Tour:

Saturday, November 6, 11am

Tour of MIT's Public Art Collection


Two short films by Emily Wardill
october 28, 2010,  7pm  &  December 9, 2010, 7pm

 

Ben (2007, 10 minutes)

Sick Serena and Dregs and Wreck and Wreck (2007, 10 minutes)

These two 16mm films screened as part of the exhibition combine theatre, visual culture, allegory, and “knots” in historical time, along with the artist’s heightened use of filmic narrative. Ben (2007), is based on one of Freud’s psychological studies, in which hypnosis is used to induce a “negative hallucination,” or the active removal of a perception (where the hypnotized subject becomes convinced they see an object that is not actually there). Sick Serena and Dregs and Wreck and Wreck (2007) revolves around a story based on a stained glass window, told through the artifice of cinematic melodrama.

 

Tavares Strachan
Orthostatic Tolerance: It Might Not Be Such a Bad Idea if I Never Went Home
MAY 7, 2010 - JULY 11, 2010
 
Opening Reception
Thursday, May 6, 6-8pm

Pre-reception panel discussions with artist Tavares Strachan and MIT residency partners. 5:30pm, Bartos Theatre 
 
Prior the to the opening reception List Visual Arts Center is pleased to present a panel discussion featuring exhibiting artist Tavares Strachan, Dava Newman, Professor, MacVicar Faculty Fellow, MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Associate Professor George Barbastathis, MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering's 3D Optical Systems Group, and Mike Soroka, Research Engineer at the MIT Sea Grant College Program’s Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Lab.  The panelists who participated in Strachan's artist residency program at MIT will discuss their experiences collaborating with the artist.
 
This pre-reception talk will be moderated by LVAC director Jane Farver.
 
Lunchtime Gallery Talks:
Wednesday, May 19, 12:30pm
Gallery talk with LVAC curator Joao Ribas
 
Wednesday, May 26, 12:30pm
Gallery talk with LVAC director Jane Farver
 
Wednesday, June 9, 12:30pm
Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga
 
Gallery Talks:
Saturday, May 22, 2pm
Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga
 
Thursday, May 27, 6pm
Gallery talk with Mark Linga and MIT Professor George Barbathasis
 
Thursday, June 3, 6pm
Gallery talk with artist Tavares Strachan
 
Saturday, June 12, 2pm
Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga
 
Thursday, June 17, 6pm
Gallery talk with LVAC curator Joao Ribas
 
Public Art Tour:
Saturday, May 15, 11am
Tour of MIT's Public Art Collection
 

LVAC Film Night: Perfumed Nightmare
MAY 20, 2010,  7PM
 
(1978/PHILIPPINES/91 MIN.) DIR. KIDLAT TAHIMIK
 
Winner of the International Critics Award at the Berlin Film Festival and a Blue Ribbon at the American Film Festival. There is nothing evern remotely nightmarish about Perfumed Nightmare. It's an enchanting and poignant experience, a totally original seriocomic creation with an infectious and exuberant energy. The film is a semi-autobiographical fable by a young Filipino about his awakening to, and reaction against, American Cultural Colonialism. Born in 1942 during the Occupation, Kidlat spent "the next 33 typhoon seasons in a cocoon of American dreams". This, then, is his perfumed nightmare: the lotusland of American technological promise. In his primitive village, he worships the heroism of the Machine, the sleek beauty of rockets, the efficiency of industrialism. He's the president of his village's Werner Von Braun fan club. He longs to visit Cape Canaveral, to experience those shimmering images he knows from movies, from soldiers, from the Voice of America.
 
"One of the most original and poetic works of cinema made anywhere" - Werner Herzog
 
LVAC Film Night: Interkosmos
June 10, 2010,  7PM
 
(US/2006/71 MIN.) DIR. JIM FINN
 
This LVAC Film Night will feature a post-screening conversation between Interkosmos director Jim Finn and LVAC adjunct film curator, John Gianvito.
 
Sending up the bombast and ambition of the Cold War-era space race, this bizarre mockumentary follows the progress of a fictitious East German program known as Interkosmos. The film incorporates animation, fake newsreels, musical numbers, and live-action scenes in its chronicle of the plan to use space voyages to discover inhabitable worlds on which to plant the Communist flag.
 
"A cosmonaut romance set aboard a 1970s East German space mission to colonize the moons of Saturn and Jupiter, Interkosmos weaves together lovingly faked archival footage, charmingly undermotivated musical numbers, propagandistic maxims ('Capitalism is like a kindergarten of boneless children'), stop-motion animation (of a suitably crude GDR-era level), a Teutonic (and vaguely Herzogian) voiceover, and a superb garage-y Kraut-rock score (by Jim Becker and Colleen Burke). Finn's deadpan is immaculately bone-dry, and his antiquarian fastidiousness is worthy of Guy Maddin." -Dennis Lim, Village Voice

 

 

Virtuoso Illusion: Cross Dressing and the New Media Avant-Garde
February 5 - April 10, 2010
Hayden, Reference, Bakalar Galleries


Opening Reception: Thursday, February 4, 6-8PM

Pre-Reception Artists/Curator Panel Discussion: Bartos Theatre, 5:30PM

Reception preceded by a panel discussion in the Bartos Theatre with exhibiting artists Charles Atlas, Michelle Handelman, and John Kelly - moderated by curator Michael Rush.

Thursday, February 11, 2010, 7PM, Bartos Theatre

 

LVAC Film Night: Two films by Jack Smith and a rare screening of Adolfo Arrieta's The Adventures of Sylvia Couski

Overstimulated (US/1960/5 minutes) dir., Jack Smith
Flaming Creatures (US/1963/45 min.) dir., Jack Smith
The Adventures of Sylvia Couski (France/1972/85 min) A film by Adolfo Arrieta

Wednesday February 17, 2010 9:30pm, Brattle Theatre
CineMental and The List Present: BloodSisters and a sneak peek of Dorian by Michelle Handelman
40 Brattle Street Harvard Sq. Cambridge

 

Thursday, March 11, 7-9pm, Bartos Theatre
LVAC Film Night: Two Films by Steve Arnold

The Liberation of The Mannique Mechanique (US/1967/15 min.)
Luminous Procuress (US/1971/74 mins)

Wednesday, February 17, 12:30PM
Mark Linga, LVAC Educator

Wednesday, February 24, 12:30PM
Jane Farver, LVAC Director

Wednesday, March 10, 12:30PM
Mark Linga, LVAC Educator

Thursday, March 18, 2010, 6PM
Michael Rush, guest Curator

Thursday, April 1, 2010, 6PM
João Ribas, LVAC Curator

Saturday, February 27, 2PM
Mark Linga

Saturday, March 20, 2PM

Mark Linga, LVAC Educator

Saturday, April 3, 10AM
LVAC public art curator Patricia Fuller leads a tour of MIT’s public art collection.



The Annual Max Wasserman Forum on Contemporary Art: Parody, Politics, and Performativity
Saturday, March 13, 3PM

Ray and Maria Stata Center, Rm. 123
32 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA



The MIT List Visual Arts Center has gathered together several practicing artists and experts on performative practices to participate in the 2010 Wasserman Forum. This year’s forum will include a panel discussion with artists Tino Sehgal, Tania Bruguera, and the collective artist Claire Fontaine, moderated by writer and curator Jens Hoffmann, with respondents Dorothea von Hantelmann, Frazer Ward, and Joan Jonas. The forum will examine a variety of artistic practices in which the passage of time and the relationship to the viewer are significant. Unlike traditional art objects that are characterized by a physical permanence, many of the works created by the panel participants question and undermine, often in humorous ways, the common forms of how institutions present, collect, and display most art today.


Parody, Politics, and Performativity will take place on Saturday, March 13 with a panel discussion at 3PM, followed by responses beginning at 4:45. The forum is open and free to the public.



TOURNAMENT OF 'TUBING

February 25, 2010 6-8PM

The MIT List Visual Arts Center's "Tournament of "Tubing" is a participatory game show to determine the greatest "Youtuber" of the Boston Metropolitan area.

Based on the everyday sharing of online media, the competition pits audience participants against each other in a series of fast paced rounds scored by a panel of judges.

Juried by Suelin Chen, Emily Isenberg, Matthew Nash, and Kristen Wawruck

Open and free to the public.
Just bring your memes.


Bartos Theatre, Weisner Building (E-15), MIT
20 Ames St. Cambridge, MA 02139
6-8PM

Program sponsor: Peter de Florez ‘38 humor fund + SHASS

 

 

 

Tobias Putrih & MOS: Without Out
October 23, 2009-January 3, 2010
Hayden, Reference Galleries

Sung Hwan Kim’s Summer Days in Keijo–written in 1937 (2007)
October 23, 2009 – January 3, 2010
Bakalar Gallery


Opening Reception: October 22, 5:30-7:30PM
Reception preceded by a conversation with artist Tobias Putrih and architect/designer Michael Meredith, moderated by curator Jane Farver
5PM, Bartos Theatre

Saturday, October 24, 10AM
A Tour of the Public Art Collection with LVAC public art curator Patricia Fuller
(Group meets at the LVAC, Bldg., E-15 20 Ames St., Cambridge)

Wednesday, October 28, 12:30 PM
Gallery Talk with Mark Linga, LVAC Educator

Thursday, November 5, 6 PM
Gallery Talk with João Ribas, LVAC Curator

Saturday, November 14, 2PM
Gallery Talk with Mark Linga, LVAC Educator

Wednesday, November 18, 12:30 PM
Gallery Talk with Mark Linga, LVAC Educator

Wednesday, December 2, 12:30 PM
Gallery Talk with Jane Farver, LVAC Director

Saturday, December 5, 2 PM
Gallery Talk with João Ribas, LVAC Curator

Wednesday, December 16,12:30 PM
Gallery Talk with Mark Linga, LVAC Educator


Other Related Programs

Thursday, November 19, 7:30PM, Bartos Theatre
LVAC Film Night: Fellini’s Roma

Wednesday, December 2, 7:30PM, Bartos Theatre

Artist Talk with Sung Hwan Kim

Thursday, December 17, 7:30PM, Bartos Theatre
LVAC Film Night: Decasia

 

 

Matthew Day Jackson:  The Immeasurable Distance
May 8 – July 12, 2009
(Hayden, Reference Galleries)


Bernadette:  A Film by Duncan Campbell
May 8 – July 12, 2009
(Bakalar Gallery)

 

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, May 7, 5:30-7:30PM 

 

 

Saturday, May 9, 2PM, Bartos Theatre
Conversation with Matthew Day Jackson and David A. Mindell

Mindell is Dibner Professor of the History of Engineering and Manufacturing, Professor of Engineering Systems at MIT, and author of Digital Apollo, MIT Press.  Moderated by exhibition curator Bill Arning.

 

Wednesday, May 13, 12:30PM
Gallery talk with LVAC educator Mark Linga

 

Thursday, May 14, 7PM, Bartos Theatre
LVAC Film Night, organized by John Gianvito
Solaris, dir., Andrei Tarkovsky, (Soviet Union, 1972, 165 min.)

 

Thursday, May 21, 7PM, Bartos Theatre
Artist Talk by Duncan Campbell

 

Saturday, May 23, 2PM
Gallery talk with Mark Linga

 

Wednesday, June 3, 12:30PM

Gallery Talk with Mark Linga

 

Thursday, June 11, 7PM, Bartos Theatre

Talk by Dominic Hall, Warren Anatomical Museum

Hall is curator of the Warren Anatomical Museum, Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

 

Wednesday, June 17, 12:30PM

Gallery Talk with Jane Farver, LVAC director

 

Thursday, June 18, 7PM, Bartos Theatre

LVAC Film Night, organized by John Gianvito

Contempt (Le Mépris), directed by Jean-Luc Godard, (France, 1963, 103 min.)

 

Wednesday, June 24, 6PM

Gallery Talk with exhibiting artist Matthew Day Jackson and curator Bill Arning.

 

Saturday, June 27, 2PM

Gallery Talk with Mark Linga

 

 

Wednesday, July 1, 12:30PM

 

Gallery Talk with Jane Farver

 

 

Melanie Smith: Spiral City & Other Vicarious Pleasures
(February 6-April 5, 2009)
Reference, Hayden, and Bakalar Galleries

Davis, Cherubini, in Contention
(February 6-April 5, 2009)
Hayden Gallery

 
 
OPENING RECEPTION: Thursday, February 5, 2009 6-8 PM
Conversation with artists Taylor Davis and Nicole Cherubini
5:30 PM, Bartos Theatre
 
Preceding the opening reception, List Center curator Bill Arning will moderate a discussion with artists Taylor Davis and Nicole Cherubini.
 
 
Saturday, February 7, 2009, 4-6 PM
In and Out of the Context of Contemporary Mexico City:
A Symposium on the Work of Melanie Smith
Harvard University David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies
CGIS Building, Room: S-050/Concourse level
1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA 02138
 
 

This joint presentation of the MIT List Visual Arts Center and Harvard’s Latin American and Latino Art Forum at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies focuses on the work of Mexico City—based artist Melanie Smith. The Art Forum Speaker Series seeks to foster critical thinking and academic debate about the topics and issues relevant to the contemporary production and history of Latin American and Latino Art. Programmed by the Art Forum’s Curator and divided into two thematic sub-series, Art Lab and Artists on Their Art, the talks last one and a half hours, are conducted in English (unless noted otherwise) and follow the same format: an invited main speaker and a panel of commentators—usually composed by members of the Harvard or the Greater Boston community—engage in dialogue.
 
Panelists:
 
Melanie Smith
Born in 1965, in Poole, England, Smith has lived and worked in Mexico City since 1989. Smith’s work has recently been exhibited at the Tate Gallery, London, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego. She has exhibited with Peter Kilchmann in Zurich, Switzerland; OMR Gallery in Mexico City, Mexico; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Madrid, Spain; The Tamayo Museum of Contemporary Art in Mexico City; UCLA Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, California; and the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, Massachusetts. Her work is featured in the exhibition Melanie Smith: Spiral City & Other Vicarious Pleasures, organized by Cuauhtémoc Medina, which is on view at MIT List Visual Arts Center (February 6-April 5, 2009).
 
Cuauhtémoc Medina
Medina is an art critic, curator and historian, who lives and works in Mexico City. He holds a PhD in Art History and Theory from the University of Essex, UK, and is a researcher at the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas at the National University of Mexico. Between 2002 and 2008, Medina was the first Associate Curator of Latin American Art Collections at the Tate Modern in London. He recently organized a historical show the Age of Discrepancy: Art and Culture in Mexico 1968-1997, in collaboration with Olivier Debroise, Pilar García and Alvaro Vázquez (shown at MUCA in Mexico City, MALBA in Buenos Aires, and Pinacoteca Do Estado in Sao Paulo). Among his recent publications are: Francis Alÿs (Phaidon, 2007), Melanie Smith: Spiral City & Other Vicarious Pleasures (México, A&R, 2006) and “‘The 21st century has just begun’… beyond the poetic and political divide”, published in: Out of the studio! (Hasselt, Z33 Art Centre, 2008).
 
Diane E. Davis
Davis is a Professor of Political Sociology at MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning. She is the author of Urban Leviathan: Mexico City in the Twentieth Century (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1994).
 
Moderator:
 
James Oles
Oles is Assistant Professor of Art History at Wellesley College, who teaches the history of Latin American art, focusing on Mexico, and Adjunct Curator of Latin American Art, Davis Museum and Cultural Center at Wellesley College.
 
Respondents:
 
José Falconi
Falconi is Fellow/Curator of the Rockefeller Center’s Art Forum exhibitions and speaker series at Harvard University.
 
Bill Arning
Arning is curator for the MIT List Visual Arts Center in Cambridge, MA.
 
Gallery Talks:

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2PM
Mark Linga, LVAC Educator
 
Thursday, February 19, 6PM
Bill Arning, LVAC Curator
 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2PM
Bill Arning, LVAC Curator
 
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 12:30PM
Jane Farver, LVAC Director
 
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 12:30PM
Mark Linga, LVAC Educator
 
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2PM
Mark Linga, LVAC Educator
 
Wednesday, April 1, 12:30PM
Bill Arning, LVAC Curator

 

 

Adel Abdessemed:  Situation and Practice
(October11 - January 4, 2009)

 

Public Education Programs:

EXHIBITION OPENING RECEPTION:  FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2008 FROM 6–8PM
CONVERSATION WITH ARTIST ADEL ABDESSEMED AND CURATOR JANE FARVER
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 5:30PM, 45 CARLETON STREET, MIT BLDG. E25, ROOM 111

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 7:00PM, BARTOS THEATRE
LECTURE AND BOOK-SIGNING WITH PAUL D. MILLER AKA DJ SPOOKY THAT SUBLIMINAL KID

In Sound Unbound (MIT Press, 2008), Miller, author of Rhythm Science, asks
thirty-six artists to describe their work and compositional strategies. Contributors
include: Pierre Boulez, Dick Hebdige, Beryl Korot, Moby, Hans Ulrich Obrist,
Pauline Oliveros, Philippe Parreno, Ibrahim Quraishi, and Steve Reich. Miller's
lecture will feature historic texts, rare audio recordings, and films, to demonstrate
the complex relationship between text and art in a multimedia context.

THE 2008 MAX WASSERMAN FORUM ON CONTEMPORARY ART
EASTERN EUROPE TODAY AND THE ROLE OF ART IN TIMES OF CHANGE
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14 & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15

This year’s forum will present screenings and discussions to consider the role
of art and culture after two decades of rapid and tumultuous political, social,
economic, and cultural changes in Eastern Europe.

ALGERIA IN FRANCE— A TALK BY PAUL SILVERSTEIN
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11, 7PM, BARTOS THEATRE

Silverstein, associate professor of anthropology at Reed College and Carnegie
Scholar, is author of Algeria in France: Transpolitics, Race and Nation (Indiana,
2004) and will discuss the complex relationship of Algeria to France, focusing
on the lives of Algerian immigrants in contemporary French culture.


GALLERY TALKS

Wednesday, October 15, 12:30PM        Bill Arning, LVAC Curator
Saturday, October 18, 2PM                   Bill Arning
Wednesday, October 22, 12:30PM        Jane Farver, LVAC Director
Wednesday, November 5, 12:30PM      Jane Farver
Thursday, November 6, 6PM                 Bill Arning
Wednesday, November 19, 12:30PM    Mark Linga, LVAC Educator
Wednesday, December 10, 12:30PM    Mark Linga
Saturday, December 20, 2PM               Mark Linga

MIT PUBLIC ART TOUR
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11, 12PM; RAIN DATE–SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 12PM

Check listart.mit.edu for weather updates. Tour departs from LVAC galleries.
 
FILM SCREENING
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23, 7:30PM, BARTOS THEATRE

Battle of Algiers, directed by Gillo Pontecorvo, (Italy/Algeria, 1966, 121 min.)

LVAC FILM NIGHTS, ORGANIZED BY JOHN GIANVITO

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, BARTOS THEATRE, 7:30PM
Pierre Bourdieu: Sociology is a Martial Art, directed by Pierre Carles,
(France, 2002, 146 min.)

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, BARTOS THEATRE, 7:30PM
Chronicle of the Years of Embers, directed by Mohamed Lakhdar-Hamina,
(Algeria, 1975, 175 min.)

 

Summer Films at the LVAC

 

 

Tuesday, July 29, 7PM, Bartos Theatre
Christmas in July
(1940/USA) 67 min., dir., Preston Sturges

This 1940 screwball comedy film was written and directed by Preston Sturges based on his 1931 play A Cup of Coffee.  The film stars Dick Powell and Ellen Drew.  Powell plays Jimmy McDonald, an office clerk who loves entering contests in the hopes of someday winning a fortune and marrying the girl he loves. His latest attempt is the Maxford House Coffee Slogan Contest. As a joke, some of his co-workers put together a fake telegram which says that he won the $25,000 grand prize. As a result, he gets a promotion, buys presents for all of his family and friends, and proposes to his girl. When the truth comes out, he's not prepared for the consequences.

Wednesday, July 30, 7PM, Bartos Theatre
Summer aka The Green Ray (1986/France) 98 min., dir. Eric Rohmer

Delphine played by Marie Rivière is the central character in Rohmer’s romantic comedy.  The movie opens at the start of Delphine’s summer vacation.  Her travel plans are suddenly thrown into disarray when her girlfriend ditches her and Delphine is left moping around Paris, depressed and self-pitying.  The film follows Delphine’s misadventures as she seeks to find what she wants:  happiness and true love.

“Much like Delphine, Summer initially seems slight, but it's a movie of uncommon sensitivity and emotional reserves. Delphine is no great philosopher. Yet she's a woman who uses her mind, if only, sometimes, to go in self-searching circles. As played by Miss Riviere, she's funny, gallant, irritating and terrifically romantic.  Delphine is the archetypal Rohmer heroine, a character who could exist only in a film. She's a remarkable, collaborative composition of the director's vision, the actress's personality, the settings through which she moves and the sounds she hears, which, in addition to the words (not always kind) of her friends, include street noises, music, the passing of the occasional airplane, birds, even the wind in the trees.” – Vincent Canby, New York Times

 

Thursday, July 31, 7PM, Bartos Theatre
Rhapsody in August (1991/Japan) 98 min., dir., Akira Kurosawa

 

The themes of pacifism and memory in Kurosawa’s anti-war film unfold as a grandmother shares her stories on the bombing of Nagasaki with her grandchildren.  These stories fascinate, confuse, and frighten the children, while their parents, the middle generation, want to forget the war and cash in on connections with American relatives.

This film program was organized by LVAC adjunct film curator John Gianvito.

 

CHANTAL AKERMAN:  MOVING THROUGH TIME AND SPACE
(MAY 2-JULY 6, 2008)


THURSDAY, MAY 1
OPENING RECEPTION:  6-8PM


THURSDAY, MAY 1, 5:30-7PM, BARTOS THEATRE
Conversation between Chantal Akerman and curator Terrie Sultan with an introduction by Harvard University scholar Giuliana Bruno (co-sponsored with the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program)

THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 6PM, BARTOS THEATRE
Akerman in Her Many Contexts, this talk by LVAC curator Bill Arning provides an in-depth examination of Chantal Akerman’s work as a filmmaker and an artist.

Gallery Talks

WEDNESDAY, MAY 7, 12:30PM  
Jane Farver, LVAC Director
 
SATURDAY, MAY 10, 2PM      
Mark Linga, LVAC Educator
 
WEDNESDAY, MAY 14, 12:30PM  
Bill Arning, LVAC Curator
 
SATURDAY, MAY 17, 2PM 
Bill Arning
 
THURSDAY, MAY 29, 6PM
Claire Grace, Ph.D. candidate, Harvard University
 
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4, 12:30 PM

Mark Linga
 
SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 2PM
      
Claire Grace
 
SATURDAY, JUNE 21, 2PM      
Mark Linga

MIT Public Art Tour

SATURDAY, MAY 17, 10AM  

Patricia Fuller, LVAC Public Art Curator
RAINDATE:  SUN., MAY 18, 10AM

FILM SCREENINGS:


LVAC Film Nights, organized by John Gianvito

THURSDAY, MAY 15, BARTOS THEATRE, 7:30PM

Four Corners (US/1997/80min.) dir., James Benning


FRIDAY, JUNE 27, BARTOS THEATRE, 7:30PM

Voyages (France/199/111min.) dir., Emmanuel Finkiel

The Films of Chantal Akerman
Presented by the Museum of Fine Arts Boston in conjunction with the MIT List Visual Arts Center’s exhibition Chantal Akerman:  Moving through Time and Space.  SCREENINGS TAKE PLACE AT THE MFA.  For more information: www.mfa.org/film.  For tickets, call the box office at 617-369-3306


WED, MAY 21
5:00PM    Chantal Akerman by Chantal Akerman (2001, 64 min)
6:30PM    Je Tu Il Elle (1974, 90 min)

THU, MAY 22
2:00PM    Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1972, 200 min)
6:00PM    Les Rendez-vous d’Anna (1977, 127 min)

SAT, MAY 24
10:30AM    Chantal Akerman by Chantal Akerman (2001, 64 min)
12:00PM    Je Tu Il Elle (1974, 90 min)

SUN, MAY 25
10:30AM    Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles  (1972, 200 min)
 
WED, MAY 28

5:40PM    Les Rendez-vous d’Anna (1977, 127 min)

CineMental at the Brattle
Wednesday, June 18, 9:30PM, Brattle Theatre Cambridge
40 Brattle Street, Harvard Sq. Cambridge
9.30pm, $10, all ages

CineMental at the Brattle will be presenting short films inspired by the work of
Belgian filmmaker Chantal Akerman.


CineMental is co-directed by James Nadeau and Aliza Shapiro, who have been involved with programming for the Boston Gay and Lesbian Film/Video Festival for the past seven years. Along with other local programmers they have created a series that explores the fringes of queer film, video, and groundbreaking performative work with a decidedly alternative perspective.
 
For more info:  http://www.truthserum.org or contact: Aliza Shapiro 617.288.8145 or James Nadeau:
cinemental.boston@gmail.com

David Claerbout (February 8-April 6, 2008)

 

 

Friday, February 8, 5PM, Bartos Theatre

Conversation betwen artist David Claerbout and LVAC curator Bill Arning

 

Wednesday, February 20, 12:30pm      
Gallery Talk by Jane Farver, LVAC Director

 

Thursday, February 21, 6:30pm
Artist Talk by Mary Lucier, whose work, Arabesque, is on view on the Media Test Wall, (21 Ames St., Bldg. 56)
Bldg. 32 (Stata Center), Rm. 155

Saturday, March 8, 2pm          
Gallery Talk by Bill Arning, LVAC Curator

Thursday, March 13, 6pm          
Gallery Talk by Bill Arning, LVAC Curator

Thursday, March 13, 2008, 7:30pm

Film Nights, Bartos Theatre

Films by Ken Jacobs
Capitalism: Child Labor (USA/2006, 14 min.)
Capitalism: Slavery (USA/2006, 3 min.)
Flo Rounds a Corner (USA/1999, 6 min.)
Ontic Antics Starring Laurel and Hardy: By Molly (USA/2005, 90 min.)

Wednesday, March 19, 12:30pm    
  
Gallery Talk by Mark Linga, LVAC Educator

Wednesday, March 19, 7pm,  Bartos Theatre

David Joselit, Yale University art historian and author of Feedback-Television Against Democracy (MIT Press, 2007) in conversation with Caroline A. Jones, Professor in MIT’s History, Theory, Criticism section of the Department of Architecture
 
Friday, March 21, 7:30pm
Film Nights, Bartos Theatre

Short Works by Rebecca Meyers and James Herbert
how to sleep (winds) (USA/2000, 9 min.) dir. Rebecca Meyers
lions and tigers and bears (USA/2006, 3 min.) dir. Rebecca Meyers
Apalachee (USA/1974, silent, 13 min.) dir. James Herbert
Silk (USA/1977, 25 min.) dir. James Herbert

Saturday, March 22, 2pm         
Gallery Talk by Mark Linga, LVAC Educator
 
Wednesday, April 2, 12:30pm
      
Gallery Talk by Bill Arning, LVAC Curator

Friday, April 4, 12pm

MIT Public Art Tour (departs LVAC galleries)
Rain date: Sunday, April 6

 

Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
   1 2 34-3-2014
Curator's Final Thoughts Tour
4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 124-12-2014
Slow Art Day
13 14 15 164-16-2014
In-Gallery Chat with Andrea Sutton
174-17-2014
Thursday @ the List
18 19
20 21 224-22-2014
Family Week at the List: Nature
234-23-2014
Family Week at the List: Geometry
244-24-2014
Family Week at the List: Architecture
254-25-2014
Family Week at the List: Color and Texture
26
27 28 29 30